• Thursday, September 03, 2020 10:41 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Spring of 2020 set back many with the realization that COVID-19 was going to affect us for far longer than hoped. Places closed, families went into quarantine, and everyone was left wondering—what happens next?

    One of the Sawgrass Nature Center and Wildlife Hospital’s main goals was to continue our mission of Environmental Education. No other program meets that goal like our youth camp, Camp Wild. However, Spring Camp had already been cancelled, so there was no precedent to running a successful camp during a pandemic. But the need for a sense of normalcy and a place for children to go have fun and further their education was definitely there.

    Camp Wild 2020 – Summer Session continued under new rules and safety regulations. An average camp size of thirty, was reduced to a capacity of fifteen. In the open-air outdoor classroom at the Sawgrass Nature Center, assigned seats and spaces were created for campers with a six-foot minimum distance between them. Masks were required and worn at almost all times, apart from food and water breaks. Mandatory hand washing and hand sanitizing was scheduled throughout the day. Regular reminders to keep their hands to themselves, to show care for their friends’ safety by not sharing, and the risks involved with breaking the very important safety rules helped campers understand the role they were playing toward a safe and successful camp experience.

    The curriculum and activities were also adapted to the new safety requirements. Typical toys and games that could not be easily sanitized (playdough, crayons, Legos) were substituted with items that could be kept clean and separate. When it came time for crafts, every camper was preassigned their own set of supplies and materials. Counselors were then responsible for collecting and cleaning supplies.

    One of the most difficult issues of running an outdoor camp during COVID-19 is the requirement of face masks. How do we ensure the campers keep them on and that they are breathing properly in the face of Florida’s unrelenting heat? Fortunately, face masks have proven to be quite breathable. Campers were told that if they ever felt like they needed a mask break, or that they were breathing too hard, a safe space would be made for them to breathe freely.

    With all these safety regulations, Camp Wild attendees were able to participate in typical camp activities like outdoor games, dip netting, slogging, bug hunting, and more. Camp Wild 2020 was a success in the face of global crisis. Six weeks of successful operation showed us that there is a way to keep our children safe and educated during uncertain times and for them to have a fun summer camp experience.


  • Tuesday, September 01, 2020 3:55 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Job Description:

    Specialized work assisting in the daily operation of the city’s Boyd Hill Nature Preserve, including the implementation and conducting of related environmental educational programs, the monitoring of campsites, cabins and park facilities, and other related activities. Work involves designing, scheduling, promoting, and conducting informative guided tours, educational programs and presentations for the general public regarding wildlife, vegetation, energy systems and ecological relationships represented in the nature preserve; assisting a supervisor in the development of special events and coordinating volunteer workers' activities; designing and maintaining nature displays, exhibits and gardens; caring and feeding of captive wildlife, including birds of prey; some maintenance of the preserve; and enforcement of preserve rules and regulations, including ensuring that the park’s doors, gates and locks are secured. Work also involves monitoring all incoming guests through the campground gate; performing routine patrols and rental inspections; assisting with cashier and camping reservation duties; and cleaning/maintenance of campgrounds, campsites, rental facilities and restrooms Work will require considerable public contact and the exercise of independent good judgment, tact and diplomacy; outdoor duties in all types of weather; evening, weekend and holiday work hours; and occasional work in the nature preserve which requires travel off the established trails.

    Close Date: 09-10-2020 (11:59 PM DST)

    Learn more here.

  • Tuesday, September 01, 2020 3:33 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Webinar: COVID-Friendly Outdoor Classroom Infrastructure and Design

    September 2 // 2pm-3:15pm ET

    There is an urgent need to reimagine PreK-12 schools in order to reopen safely and equitably. Repurposing outdoor spaces is a cost-effective way to reduce the burden on indoor classrooms while providing fresh air, hands-on learning opportunities, and the health benefits associated with increased access to nature. Join Sharon Danks, a leader of the National COVID-19 Outdoor Learning Initiative, author of Asphalt to Ecosystems, and founder of Green Schoolyards America, to learn about her work supporting the creation of outdoor classrooms for reopening schools. This webinar is hosted by School Garden Support Organizations. Register here.

    Panel Discussion: Rooting out Structural Racism in American Agriculture

    September 3 // 6pm-8pm ET

    Join Vermont Law School's Center for Agriculture and Food Systems for an upcoming virtual panel discussion to discuss Black land loss, the connection between agriculture and environmental justice, and the role of law and policy professionals in rooting out racism in the food system. Several lawyers fighting structural racism in agricultural law and policy will be featured. The event is free and no registration is required.

    Reclaiming Health Through Indigenous Food Systems: A Discussion on the Film “Gather”

    September 8 // 10am ET

    A unique opportunity to watch the new film, "Gather," prior to its public debut! With registration, you will have a 96 hour window to watch the film. Join Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) North America for a panel discussion with the film director and featured Indigenous figures from the film. Panelists will share their insights on the timely and critical nature of Indigenous peoples' knowledge, languages, cultures, innovation and leadership as Native communities build up their traditional food systems across North America. Learn more and register.

    Black Farming: Beyond "40 Acres and a Mule"

    September 11-12

    People of African descent have a long agricultural tradition. In spite of their forced farm labor under chattel slavery in the Americas, in emancipation most African Americans returned to this tradition as independent farmers or sharecroppers. Co-sponsored with Antioch College and The National Afro American Museum and Cultural Center, this conference will be discussing the influential history of black farmers in Ohio with an emphasis on the strength of community, preparing the next generation of underrepresented farmers for the future, and cultivating the cooperative business model to promote healthy farming and sustainable businesses. There will be keynote addresses, breakout sessions, networking, a resource fair, and more! Learn more and register.

    Back to School 2020: Feeding Young Minds in Uncertain Times

    Webinar Recording

    Watch former U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and a panel of national school food experts discussing why no matter what schools look like – remote, in person, or hybrid – we have a responsibility to ensure every child gets the food they need. This discussion, sponsored by the National Press Club (NPC), was live streamed on August 17 and explored the important role school meal programs play in the overall health, education and wellbeing of students and will highlight current challenges schools are facing, proposed policy solutions, and the innovative approaches schools are taking during this time of crisis. Watch the recording here.

    Food, Agriculture, Land and Racial Justice Story Share Series

    September 8, October 13, & November 17 // 3pm-5pm ET

    Join International Organic Inspectors Association, Ceres Trust, and the National Organic Coalition during September-November 2020, in their upcoming Story/Skillshares series around the broad and intersectional themes of Food, Agriculture, Land, and Racial Justice. The first story share will be on Indigenous Resistance, Resilience, and Just Transition in the Food System. RSVP here.

    Webinar: Back-to-School Meal Service: Feeding Kids During the 2020-2021 School Year – Part 3

    September 9 // 3:30 - 4:45pm ET
    Join No Kid Hungry for the next webinar in their back-to-school meal service series! Participants will hear from two districts—Brandon Valley School District (South Dakota) and Vaughn Next Century Learning Center (California)— about their plans for feeding kids during the 2020-2021 school year. Learn more and register.

    Webinar: Serving Meals this Fall: USDA Waiver Update

    September 10 // 3pm ET
    On August 31 USDA announced the extension of key waivers which will allow the continued operation of the Summer Food Service Program and Seamless Summer Option through December 31, 2020. Join Food Research & Action Center and representatives from USDA for this webinar to hear the latest updates on the waivers and how they will impact meal service this fall. Register here.


  • Tuesday, September 01, 2020 3:28 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    1. Cigna Foundation's Healthier Kids For Our Future Grant Program

    Deadline: September 30

    Cigna Foundation is looking to partner with school systems and surrounding communities — including clinicians, local and national nonprofits — to supplement existing mental health programming and help close gaps both within and outside the school environment to address loneliness, anxiety, depression, and suicide prevention. To that end, it will fund programs that foster collaboration between various stakeholders, including school administrators and teachers, clinicians, and local and national nonprofits. The grants are up to $65,000 grants per year for two years. Learn more and apply.

    2. Voices for Healthy Kids' Policy Campaign Grant

    Short Form Application Deadline: September 30

    The Policy Campaign Grant is designed to support strategic issue advocacy campaigns supporting Voices for Healthy Kids policy priorities with a focus on health equity. Applications must be specific to an individual campaign for public policy change in one state, city, town or county, or tribal nation. Applications should focus on public policy changes to reduce health disparities for children in urban, suburban or rural settings who are Black/African American, Hispanic/Latino, American Indian, and Alaskan Native or from families who have low income.

    To learn more about the Voices for Healthy Kids policy areas - please review the descriptions in the policy lever agenda. Applications can be submitted for $50,000 - $200,000 for a duration of up to 18 months and can support non-lobbying and lobbying activities. Learn more and apply.

    3. Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Call for Proposals: Community Solutions for Health Equity

    LOI deadline: October 7

    With Community Solutions for Health Equity , RWJF seeks to make local health care systems more responsive to the needs of the community by elevating the voices, stories, priorities, and knowledge of people of color, and others who are left out of policy decisions. The Foundation's funding will provide community organizations with grant support to help increase their ability to organize members, build partnerships with other constituencies, and develop effective communication-all of which are critical to shared decisionmaking. Nine organizations will be given $300,000 each over the course of three years as part of the program. The Foundation is interested in engaging diverse groups and organizations, including those that have limited experience receiving grants of this size. Learn more and apply.

    4. Annie’s Grants for Gardens: Our 2020 application period is officially open and we are accepting applications through November 2nd! Please read our grant FAQs in full and click the button below to get started. Click here for the application

    Deadline: November 2nd

    5. School Grants from Toshiba for STEM programming

    Deadline: October 1st

    6. Food 4 Families Initiative: Youth Funding Opportunity
    The Intertribal Agriculture Council (IAC) in partnership with Farm-Aid, Indian Land Tenure Foundation, and First Nations Development Institute is proud to announce the “Food 4 Families”  initiative. While funds last, IAC is awarding coupons to cover processing fees of eligible show animals. Are you a Tribal youth that is an active 4H/FFA member in Indian Country? Did you have a recent COVID-19 related cancellation of your local live auction prevent you from marketing your 2020 4H/FFA Livestock Animal? If you answered YES to both questions, you qualify to apply! Learn more and apply.

    7. Cigna Foundation's Healthier Kids For Our Future Grant Program

    Deadline: September 30

    Cigna Foundation is looking to partner with school systems and surrounding communities — including clinicians, local and national nonprofits — to supplement existing mental health programming and help close gaps both within and outside the school environment to address loneliness, anxiety, depression, and suicide prevention. To that end, it will fund programs that foster collaboration between various stakeholders, including school administrators and teachers, clinicians, and local and national nonprofits. The grants are up to $65,000 grants per year for two years. Learn more and apply.

    8. Voices for Healthy Kids' Policy Campaign Grant

    Short Form Application Deadline: September 30

    The Policy Campaign Grant is designed to support strategic issue advocacy campaigns supporting Voices for Healthy Kids policy priorities with a focus on health equity. Applications must be specific to an individual campaign for public policy change in one state, city, town or county, or tribal nation. Applications should focus on public policy changes to reduce health disparities for children in urban, suburban or rural settings who are Black/African American, Hispanic/Latino, American Indian, and Alaskan Native or from families who have low income.
    To learn more about the Voices for Healthy Kids policy areas - please review the descriptions in the policy lever agenda. Applications can be submitted for $50,000 - $200,000 for a duration of up to 18 months and can support non-lobbying and lobbying activities. Learn more and apply.

    9. Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Call for Proposals: Community Solutions for Health Equity

    LOI deadline: October 7

    With Community Solutions for Health Equity , RWJF seeks to make local health care systems more responsive to the needs of the community by elevating the voices, stories, priorities, and knowledge of people of color, and others who are left out of policy decisions. The Foundation's funding will provide community organizations with grant support to help increase their ability to organize members, build partnerships with other constituencies, and develop effective communication-all of which are critical to shared decisionmaking. Nine organizations will be given $300,000 each over the course of three years as part of the program. The Foundation is interested in engaging diverse groups and organizations, including those that have limited experience receiving grants of this size. Learn more and apply.

  • Thursday, August 20, 2020 8:57 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    LEEF now has beautiful face masks to add to the list of fun merchandise you can purchase to support your favorite Environmental Education organization. Visit our merchandise website and treat yourself.

    Happy Shopping!

  • Thursday, August 20, 2020 8:54 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Don’t Waste It! State Content Specialist:


    About Don’t Waste It!:

    Don’t Waste It! is a collaborative project across North Carolina, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. The original Don’t Waste It! guide was developed by Chatham County Solid Waste & Recycling in North Carolina in 2019, through updating outdated lessons and activities from other resources and creating new lessons and activities. There are five themes in Don’t Waste It! with accompanying lessons: Municipal Solid Waste, Recycling, Plastics, Composting, and Landfills. Thanks to support from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), we will create an updated and expanded North Carolina version and new versions for the other six partner states, developed by the Project Lead and Content Specialists from each partner state.

    The goals of the Don’t Waste It! project are to help current and future educators across the southeast understand the systems for municipal solid waste, landfills, material recovery facilities, recycling, and composting in their state, and then provide them with resources and lessons to share this knowledge with students, in order to inspire their local communities to get involved with composting, recycling, waste reduction, and other activities that revitalize land and reduce contamination in EPA Region 4.

    Responsibilities:

    LEEF will hire a Content Specialist in the solid waste field who will work with the Project Lead to collect and update the Don’t Waste It! guide with appropriate content for Florida. Examples of state-specific content include: local recycling and waste statistics, local check-out programs for equipment/tools/teaching resources, local solid waste and recycling contacts, guidelines for what is or is not recyclable in a particular location, lesson correlations to state education standards, etc.

    Timeline and Commitment:

    The target date of completion for each state curriculum guide is January 31, 2021.  Overall, we estimate this project will take a total of 20-30 hours, but actual time commitment may vary.

    Qualifications:

         Significant knowledge of solid waste operations, statistics, contacts/organizations, and resources for your state.

         Strong knowledge of your state’s education/curriculum standards, particularly science and social studies for grades K-12.

         Familiarity or ability to become familiar with the North American Association for Environmental Education (NAAEE) Guidelines for Excellence: Environmental Education Materials.

         Excellent attention to detail.

         Strong writing skills, especially relating to grammar, consistent formatting, and accuracy in transposing dates/numbers in written communications.

         Ability to work independently and meet deadlines.

    • LEEF Member

    Compensation:

    $500 stipend upon successful update of all state-specific information in the Don’t Waste It! guide. This can be paid to an individual or to an employer to cover a portion of an employee’s salary.

    Apply:

    Please email LEEF Executive Director, Terran McGinnis, at director@leef-florida.org to express your interest by 5pm on September 4, 2020.

  • Wednesday, August 19, 2020 3:14 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    The executive director reports to the board of directors and works with elected officials and the board to develop a strategic plan and vision for the association and for carrying out the policies and directives formulated by the board by overseeing overall operations of the National Science Teaching Association (NSTA), including oversight of a 78-person staff and a budget of $25 million.

    Screening of complete applications will begin immediately and continue until the application deadline of September 1, 2020. Inquiries, nominations, referrals, and CVs with cover letters should be sent to NSTA.ExecDirSearch@gmail.com. Electronic submission of materials is strongly encouraged. For additional information, please contact Dr. Christine Royce, Search Committee Chairperson, at the above email address.

    For more information, click here.

  • Friday, August 14, 2020 8:47 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Birds are incredibly beneficial to us humans. Birds are a natural insect and rodent control and clean up carcasses. We listen to their songs and observe their beautiful colors and behaviors. Birds prompt us to walk trails and beaches to enjoy them, thus providing psychological and physical wellness to us. Environmental and commercial jobs are created and millions of dollars are earned in the travel and recreational industry annually because of birds. They are found around the world, including your backyard.

    Yet, we lost over 2.9 billion birds over the past 50 years in the US and Canada (published by Cornell Lab of Ornithology). It’s time to help and give back to the birds. We all can do it. Conservation starts right at your home.

    Create a bird-friendly habitat in your yard. Remove invasive non-native plants. Minimize your lawn. Lawn is dead green space on which we waste our water and often use chemicals harmful to the environment. Instead embrace in the beauty of Florida. Plant native plants and trees. Leave some leaf litter and a dead tree, or at least the trunk. It’s a haven for many bird species.

    Avoid trimming and pruning plants and trees during breeding season. You only destroy habitat by doing so. Consider providing nest boxes and nest material, like your pets fur or your hair. The birds will flock to your yard.

    Use your consciousness! Avoid single use plastic items and Styrofoam, which doesn’t break down for 500+ years. Use reusable containers and straws for your food and beverage, if you have to.

    Recycle, it reduces pollution and is easy to do. Eat organic food. Over 1 billion pounds of pesticides are used annually in the agricultural industry in the US. These are toxic for you, the wildlife and environment.

    Join a citizen science project and give back to our planet. We only have that ONE.

    Say NO to fertilizers, herbicides, rodenticides and pesticides, they kill our birds.

    Protect the birds, help them and be certain they will thank you!  

    https://www.birds.cornell.edu/citizenscience/about-the-projects/

    https://www.zooniverse.org/

    https://www.audubon.org/


  • Tuesday, August 11, 2020 3:12 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    LEEF's Organizational Members now have their very own webpage so that we can brag about them, and they have their very own "Proud Member of LEEF" logo so they can brag about their membership with us!

    Do you know of a teacher, student, or client looking for a business represented among our members? Direct them to our website and let this be a priceless perk of membership with LEEF!

    Are you an individual member who works for an EE organization? Ask them to consider joining so they can benefit from this free marketing tool.

  • Wednesday, August 05, 2020 5:25 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Register by September 2, 2020 at www.universe.com/wet2020

Founded in 1983, the League of Environmental Educators in Florida is the professional association for individuals and organizations dedicated to the cause of environmental education in Florida. We are the state affiliate for North American Association for Environmental Education (NAAEE), an organization that brings together those interested in the study and enjoyment of our natural world and one that has promoted excellence in environmental education throughout North America and the world for over four decades.  

The League of Environmental Educators in Florida is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.

© 2020 by the League of Environmental Educators in Florida.


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